Leave a comment

Inside The Sourcers Brain


If you could pop the hood of the cranium of some of the best sourcers, and look inside to see just how their brain is wired, I think there might be a few surprises.

 
Technical aptitude, fluency in geek speak, programming etc are going to be there in abundance but it is all only part of the mix. you can learn all these things from a wise old sourcing master.
The most important sourcing skill however, and one you can never learn, is logic.
You can’t learn logic,and   whatever people may say, you can’t automate it. The most important skill that separates the really succesful talent sourcer from the average is the application of human logic to technology. i always find it amusing when trainers offer courses, or HR professionals bang on about teaching innovation. You can’t teach innovation. You can’t teach common sense. You can nurture those skills, encourage and allow people to take risks, allow time for discovery. if common sense and logic is missing,It’s not something that can be acquired.

 
The type of brain that thinks if this guy works at this company, he might well know someone who can do this job. I can’t see it in his social connections or his footprint, but I’m sure if I asked him he would, and if he doesn’t then he probably knows someone who does know someone.The chain continues untill the ideal person is found.
Having spent some time with some corporate recruiters recently talking sourcing and technology, it was pretty clear that many of their searches were falling short on 2 accounts:

1) They were always searching for candidates who met the target 100%. You rarely, if ever, get a 100% black and white match. The magic is in the grey. The bits you take out of the search string or the questions you ask to locate someone close enough to the spec to do it.
2) Thinking of the result of a boolean string as the end of the search. The people (i don’t think of them as bio’s!) you find are the beginning. they are the people who will lead you to the talent that you really need.

I think a lot of this comes down to whether you negatively or positively match people. Most recruiters or sourcers conduct a search and identify possible candidates either from c.v.’s, LinkedIn profiles or similar and look for reasons to eliminate the potential candidates. The reasons they are not suitable for the role. I have always taken the opposite approach. I’m looking for the reasons someone could be suitable for the job.
Finding those 2 or 3 points that mean someone either can do the job, or may well be connected or know someone who could do it, this is the beginning of the search, not the end of it, and the smart sourcer uses their brain to go and unlock the clues.

TheSocialCV.Com locates people via their social footprint and connects bio’s profiles, blogs etc in one place. It is a great sourcing tool. What i find interesting when using it is how a person often only reveals their profesional details in one place, whilst being present in other channels.

In a recent search for specialist employment lawyers practicing in Dublin, with twitter accounts, i found 40 people who matched these 3 requirments. Interestingly, only 3 of the twitter accounts listed their profesional details anywhere on twitter, The profesional detail came from LinkedIn, Plaxo or Google profiles. TheSocialCV connects these places, one to the other, to find the best channel to engage. While this tech will do this, the good sourcer is always thinking where is the next placeto look. Peoples profesional details are not always obvious in their social places, but the majority of profesions are represented in the engagment channels of Twitter and Facebook. The good sourcer connectsthe social places by searching for things like geek words in content rather than obvioud bio adverts.
we’re going to be looking at sourcer DNA at #truLeeds on the 23’rd/24’th june and the Australasian talent conference Source event in August.
To start the conversation, what do you think makes up the sourcers DNA?
Bill

TheSocialCV

BUY TICKETS FOR #TRULEEDS

#ATCSource – featuring Glen Cathey, Jim Stroud, Bill Boorman and others

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: